Symptoms of conjunctivitis (pink eye) can include

  • Pink or red color in the white of the eye(s)
  • Swelling of the conjunctiva (the thin layer that lines the white part of the eye and the inside of the eyelid) and/or eyelids
  • Increased tear production
  • Feeling like a foreign body is in the eye(s) or an urge to rub the eye(s)
  • Itching, irritation, and/or burning
  • Discharge (pus or mucus)
  • Crusting of eyelids or lashes, especially in the morning
  • Contact lenses that feel uncomfortable and/or do not stay in place on the eye

How it spreads

Several viruses and bacteria can cause conjunctivitis (pink eye). Both viral and bacterial conjunctivitis are highly contagious. Each of these types of germs can spread from person to person in different ways. They usually spread from an infected person to others through

  • Close personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands
  • The air by coughing and sneezing
  • Touching an object or surface with germs on it, then touching your eyes before washing your hands

When to go back to work or school

If you have conjunctivitis, you may be allowed to remain at work or school with your doctor’s approval. However, if you still have symptoms, and your activities at work or school are such that you can’t avoid close contact with other people, you should not attend.

When to seek medical care

You should see a healthcare provider if you have conjunctivitis along with any of the following:

  • pain in the eye(s)
  • sensitivity to light or blurred vision that does not improve when discharge is wiped from the eye(s)
  • intense redness in the eye(s)
  • symptoms that get worse or don’t improve, including pink eye thought to be caused by bacteria which does not improve after 24 hours of antibiotic use

If you have questions about this or any health-related issue, please contact us at (734) 420-3331 or email nms@newmorningschool.com.